Cancer Clinical Trials

Cancer Clinical Research - For Patients.

Clinical Trials

Below is the current list of active cancer clinical trials. Click on each heading to reveal more information about each trial.

Ohio State University Trial - Details...

Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative (OCCPI) - Gastrointestinal Malignancies Colon or Rectum

The purpose of the Ohio Colorectal Cancer Prevention Initiative (OCCPI) is to reduce morbidity and mortality due to colorectal cancer (CRC) in the state of Ohio. By identifying individuals at high-risk for CRC (genetically predisposed) and providing screening recommendations for cancer risk reduction, the OCCPI will understand how to increase length of life and quality of life for those diagnosed with CRC in Ohio, as well as to better prevent CRC in others in Ohio.

Participants will have free tumor screening for Lynch syndrome, and may be eligible for free genetic testing and free genetic counseling as part of this study. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old,

  • Newly diagnosed with colorectal adenocarcinoma (all stages) and have a resection at any hospital in Ohio between 1/1/2013 and 9/30/2014.
    1. For individuals who have neoadjuvant treatment and show a complete response at resection, the tumor screening will be attempted on their original biopsy (even if it occurred in 2012) as long as their resection occurred between 1/1/2013 and 9/30/2014.
    • Many individuals with stage IV CRC will not have a resection; therefore, the tumor screening will be attempted on their original colon biopsy as long as their primary diagnosis occurred between 1/1/2013 and 9/30/2014. If only metastatic CRC is available on a biopsy (liver or lymph node metastases), tumor screening will be attempted on the metastatic tissue.

 

ECOG E7208 - Details...

Irinotecan Hydrochloride and Cetuximab With or Without Ramucirumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer With Progressive Disease After Treatment With Bevacizumab-Containing Chemotherapy - Gastrointestinal Malignancies Colon or Rectum

Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab and ramucirumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Cetuximab and ramucirumab may also stop the growth of colorectal cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet know whether giving cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride together is more effective with or without ramucirumab in treating colorectal cancer. This randomized phase II trial is studying the side effects and how well giving cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride with or without ramucirumab work in treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with progressive disease after treatment with bevacizumab -containing chemotherapy. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years of age, measureable disease, must have received  first-line therapy with oxaliplatin and bevacizumab for metastatic colorectal cancer. It has been no more that 42 days since confirmed disease progression. Having no brain or CNS metastasis, at least 28 days and no more that 90 days since bevacizumab, no surgery within the past 28 days.

CALGB 90601 - Details...

Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Urinary Tract Cancer - Genitourinary Urothelial

Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin are more effective when given together with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with urinary tract cancer. This randomized phase III trial is studying gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared with gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and placebo in treating patients with advanced urinary tract cancer. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old, cancer of the renal pelvis, ureter, bladder, prostate, or urethra. No previous peritoneal carcinomatsis, no brain metastastes, at least 4 weeks since radiation thearpy or surgery and no previous bevacizumab.

 

E1311 - Details...

Afatinib After Chemoradiation and Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck at High-Risk of Recurrence - Head and Neck

This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving afatinib after chemoradiation and surgery works in treating patients with stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck at high-risk of recurrence. Afatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old and
•Patients must have pathological evidence of persistent lymph node disease with viable tumor cells following primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy of locoregionally advanced (stage III/IV) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx; persistent lymph node disease with viable tumor cells will be determined by the histological determination of tumor viability defined as tumor cells with intact cellular compartments (i.e. cytoplasm and nucleus) that do not exhibit karyolysis, pyknosis, or karyorrhexis on hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining
•Patients must have undergone a neck dissection following completion of chemoradiotherapy and must have involved at the minimum a compartment dissection of nodal levels with residual abnormalities on post-treatment imaging studies
•Patients must have achieved a complete response at the primary disease site after chemoradiotherapy
•All persistent lymph node disease must have received at least 66 Gy of radiotherapy and must have been completely surgically resected prior to registration, and surgical incisions should be adequately healed
•Patients with extracapsular lymph node extension will be eligible
•Patients must be at least 6 weeks (42 days) and no more than 16 weeks (112 days) from completion of chemoradiation at the time of registration
•Patients will be eligible regardless of ability to swallow; patients with dysphagia may have afatinib/placebo administered via gastrostomy tube

ECOG 1305 - Details...

Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer - Head and Neck

This randomized phase III trial studies chemotherapy to see how well it works with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, carboplatin, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Bevacizumab may also make tumor cells more sensitive to chemotherapy and stop the growth of head and neck cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective when given with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with head and neck cancer. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old and

•Patients must have histologically or cytologically confirmed squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), from any primary site, including unknown primary cancers of the head and neck; patient must not have nasopharyngeal carcinoma of histologic types World Health Organization (WHO) 2 or 3 or squamous cell carcinoma that originated in the skin
•Patients must have SCCHN that is either (a) recurrent, judged incurable by surgery or radiation or (b) metastatic; NOTE: Patients who refuse radical resection for recurrent disease are eligible; NOTE: A second primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is allowed if eligibility is based on a recurrent or metastatic first primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck
•No prior chemotherapy or biologic/molecular targeted therapy for recurrent or metastatic SCCHN

◦Patients may have received one regimen of induction, concomitant chemoradiotherapy and/or adjuvant chemotherapy as part of initial potential curative therapy but must not have received prior chemotherapy for recurrent or metastatic disease
◦A minimum of 4 months is required between last dose of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and study treatment; in addition patients must be progression-free for at least 4 months after completion of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy or radiation plus cetuximab given with a curative intent; (cetuximab therapy: 4 months is required between last dose of chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy and study treatment if part of concurrent regimen, 8 weeks if part of adjuvant regimen post radiation)
◦Patients having progression after 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy are not eligible for the study
•No prior bevacizumab is allowed
•A maximum of one prior radiotherapy regimen, curative or palliative, to the head and neck is allowed. If the radiation is combined with chemotherapy and/or cetuximab, a minimum of 4 months must elapse between the end of radiotherapy and registration; if the radiation is given alone, a minimum of 8 weeks must elapse between the end of radiotherapy and registration; a minimum of 3 weeks must elapse between prior radiation to other areas and registration

RTOG 1216 - Details...

Radiation Therapy With Cisplatin, Docetaxel, or Cetuximab After Surgery in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer - Head and Neck

This randomized phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works when given together with cisplatin compared to docetaxel or cetuximab and docetaxel after surgery in treating patients with stage III-IV squamous cell head and neck cancer. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or transmit tumor killing molecules to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given with cisplatin, docetaxel, or cetuximab and docetaxel. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old,

  • Pathologically (histologically or cytologically) proven diagnosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) involving the oral cavity, oropharynx (p16 negative), larynx, or hypopharynx within 49 days of registration
  • Patients must have undergone gross total surgical resection of high-risk oral cavity, oropharynx (p16 negative), larynx, or hypopharynx within 49 days prior to registration
  • Patients must have at least 1 of the following high-risk pathologic features: extracapsular nodal extension or invasive cancer seen within 3 mm of the primary tumor resection margins
  • Pathologic stage III or IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), including no distant metastases, based upon the following minimum diagnostic workup

 

RTOG 0920 - Details...

Radiation Therapy With or Without Cetuximab in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer - Head and Neck

Giving radiation therapy that uses a 3-dimensional (3-D) image of the tumor to help focus thin beams of radiation directly on the tumor, and giving radiation therapy in higher doses over a shorter period of time, may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether radiation therapy is more effective when given alone or together with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has been removed by surgery. This randomized phase III trial is studying radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with radiation therapy given together with cetuximab in treating patients who have undergone surgery for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Eligibility includes cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx or larynx, no distant metastases or and no more than 7 weeks since surgery.

S1117 - Details...

Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia - Leukemia

This randomized phase II trial studies how well giving azacitidine works with or without lenalidomide or vorinostat in treating patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or stopping them from dividing. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping blood flow to the cancer. Vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether azacitidine is more effective with or without lenalidomide or vorinostat in treating myelodysplastic syndromes or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Inclusion Criteria: Being at least 18 years old,

 Patients must have morphologically confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)

  • Patients must not have received radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or cytotoxic therapy to treat conditions other than MDS within 12 months prior to registration
  • Patients must not have undergone prior allogeneic stem cell or bone marrow transplantation at any time; patients that have undergone an autologous stem cell transplant are eligibl
  • Patients must not have received lenalidomide, azacitidine, vorinostat, or decitabine as treatment previously; any hematopoietic growth factors must be stopped for at least 14 days prior to registration

  • Patients must not have any pre-existing neurotoxicity/neuropathy of >= grade 2 according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) Version 4.0, or prior >= grade 3 allergic reaction/hypersensitivity or rash to thalidomide that has not resolved to < grade 2
  • Patients must not have any serious medical condition, laboratory abnormality, or psychiatric illness that, in the view of the treating physician, would place the participant at an unacceptable risk if he or she were to participate in the study or would prevent that person from giving informed consent
  • Patients must not have history of thromboembolic event or other condition requiring current use of anticoagulation with Coumadin (warfarin) or low molecular-weight heparin
  • Patients must not have known or suspected hypersensitivity to mannitol

 

E1412 - Details...

Rituximab and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma - Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

This randomized phase II trial studies how well rituximab and combination chemotherapy with or without lenalidomide works in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Lenalidomide may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. It is not yet known whether rituximab and combination chemotherapy are more effective when given with or without lenalidomide in treating patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Eligibility includes being at least 18 years old and
•Histologically confirmed DLBCL expressing cluster of differentiation (CD)20 antigenpatients with transform lymphoma are excluded; patients with known primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL) are excluded; similarly, patients with known v-myc myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (avian) (c-myc) translocation (by fluorescence in situ hybridization) positive DLBCL are encouraged to participate in trials specifically designed for these patients; however patients with known c-myc positive are NOT excluded from this study; c-myc testing prior to study enrollment is NOT required
•Stages II bulky disease (defined as mass size of more than 10 cm), stage III, or IV (Ann Arbor staging); patients with stage I and stage II non-bulky disease frequently are treated with abbreviated chemoimmunotherapy followed by involved field radiation and may be eligible for other protocols and are thus excluded from this study

S1001 - Details...

PET-Directed Therapy in Treating Patients With Limited-Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma - Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Comparing results of diagnostic procedures, such as PET scan and CT scan, done before, during, and after chemotherapy may help doctors predict a patient's response to treatment and help plan the best treatment.

PURPOSE: This phase II trial studies how well PET-directed chemotherapy works in treating patients with limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

ELIGIBILITY: Being at least 18 years of age,

Patients must have biopsy-proven diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)

  • Adequate sections or a paraffin block from the original diagnostic specimen must be submitted for review by the lymphoma pathology group
  • Lymphoma must express CD20 antigen by either flow cytometry using anti-CD20 antibodies or by immunoperoxidase staining of paraffin sections
  • Patients with primary mediastinal lymphoma or testicular lymphoma are not eligible

 

  • Patients must have non-bulky stage I or II disease by Ann Arbor classification

    • This staging excludes FDG-PET evaluation
    • Patients who have stage I or II non-bulky disease on diagnostic CT scan, but are upstaged to stage III or IV based on FDG-PET evaluation, are also eligible
  • Patients must have a diagnostic quality contrast-enhanced CT scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis AND baseline FDG-PET scan performed within 28 days prior to registration

    • Low-resolution "localization" CT scans performed as part of a combined PET/CT scan are not adequate for enrollment or response determination on this protocol
    • If a patient has an allergy to CT contrast, then a non-enhanced CT will be acceptable
  • Patients must not have clinical evidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement by lymphoma

    • Any laboratory or radiographic tests performed to assess CNS involvement must be negative and must be performed within 42 days prior to registration
  • Patients may have either measurable or evaluable limited-stage DLBCL

  • Patients must have a unilateral or bilateral bone marrow biopsy performed within 42 days prior to registration

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